Caitlan’s GF Story

I have been gluten-free for about four years. I think the depression from not having the foods you love can be very dangerous.  I used to smell my friends’ food to try and experience that joy again, but for the first couple of years that would only make me tear-up, and long for the taste.  For me, the cravings don’t go away, they just change in nature.  The biggest thing I have realized in the battle for self-control when it comes to food, is that no matter how delicious the experience, it is fleeting.

I truly realized this when I would cheat and have a bite of a  fluffy, sweet bread or cookie (my weakness).  I usually wouldn’t have any symptoms for a few days, so I was seemingly free to bask in the bread flavor, for the moment.  However, I would be slightly disappointed with the short-lasting reward on my tongue (especially considering the miserable consequences).  The taste of the food would leave as quickly as it started, only to become another teasing memory.

Yes, bread & cookies taste amazing… but just like any other fun, yet harmful substance, you decide they’re not good enough.  They are empty satisfactions, with no substantial reward, and the separation becomes less emotional over-time… I promise.  I can tell you now that it has been four years, I am finally in a place where I can smell pizza or cookies and it truly makes me happy, not bitter or teary-eyed.   It really is like tasting them, vicariously, without the repercussions… I guess our senses just evolve accordingly, thank goodness!  Everything takes time, but it definitely gets easier!

I have been gluten-free for about four years. I think the depression from not having the foods you love can be very dangerous.  I used to smell my friends’ food to try and experience that joy again, but for the first couple of years that would only make me tear-up, and long for the taste.  For me, the cravings don’t go away, they just change in nature.  The biggest thing I have realized in the battle for self-control when it comes to food, is that no matter how delicious the experience, it is fleeting.

I truly realized this when I would cheat and have a bite of a  fluffy, sweet bread or cookie (my weakness).  I usually wouldn’t have any symptoms for a few days, so I was seemingly free to bask in the bread flavor, for the moment.  However, I would be slightly disappointed with the short-lasting reward on my tongue (especially considering the miserable consequences).  The taste of the food would leave as quickly as it started, only to become another teasing memory.

Yes, bread & cookies taste amazing… but just like any other fun, yet harmful substance, you decide they’re not good enough.  They are empty satisfactions, with no substantial reward, and the separation becomes less emotional over-time… I promise.  I can tell you now that it has been four years, I am finally in a place where I can smell pizza or cookies and it truly makes me happy, not bitter or teary-eyed.   It really is like tasting them, vicariously, without the repercussions… I guess our senses just evolve accordingly, thank goodness!  Everything takes time, but it definitely gets easier!

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